The Arbor Blog

Practical Life

Practical Life is the beginning of all other areas of the classroom. It is here where the children begin to become the independent, orderly, concentrated, and coordinated individuals we strive to create not only in our classroom environment, but in their everyday lives.

 

The materials themselves aim to be attractive in the sense that they are familiar. They mirror exercises children see in their daily lives-spooning, tweezing, cleaning, food preparation, etc. Through the manipulation of these materials, the children gain practice in controlled movement, hand-eye coordination, autonomy, confidence, and care for both themselves and their environment.

 

In the practical life area, you will find a variety of exercises that strengthen the hands in preparation for writing. Most of the materials force the developing hand to hold items like spoons and tweezers using the “pincher” fingers- the three fingers required for the writing (or pincer) grip. Materials in this area are also always transferred from left to right; another preparation for writing.

 

Not only are the children gaining practice for later writing exercises, but they are also gaining autonomy and confidence, for which they have a burning desire at this age. Practical life work focuses on independence in many ways. The first is the ability for them to choose what work they’d like to do and where they would like to work on it. The work itself tells them when they’ve made a mistake (such as when there is a spill or some beans have been left in the bowl after spooning) so they are able to correct their own mistakes without teacher intervention. The materials also aid in independence in daily tasks such as utensil manipulation, getting dressed, cleaning up messes, and preparing food. Achieving mastery of these materials allows for the glowing confidence that comes with mastering their own environment.

 

The practical life area also stresses care for others and care for the environment. Through the grace and courtesy lessons (the handshake, serving each other food, eye contact, waiting patiently, etc) the children are able to practice social concepts and situations that will allow them to convey the care they have for others and their environment. By working with materials like plant watering, table scrubbing, sweeping, pencil sharpening, and returning their work to the shelf where they found it, the children are gaining an important sense of respect for their shared classroom environment while also gaining a sense of community-both such important concepts to have not just throughout childhood, but as they continue on into the adult world.

 

 

 

 

Practical Life Exercises

1. Basic Exercises

Carry a chair

Walking around a rug

Preliminary transfer of dry goods

Introduction to sponging

Pouring dry goods

Wet pouring

Spooning

Tweezing

 

 

2. Care of Self                

Basting

Opening and closing containers

Putting on a coat

Snapping frame

Zipping frame

Button frame

Lacing frame

Buckling frame

Bow tying frame

Hand washing

Sequence of food preparation

Spreading

Banana slicing

Vegetable chopping

Sewing sequence

Large bead stringing

Card sewing

Button sewing

Crumbing

Dusting

Sweeping

 

 

3. Care of Environment               

  Mopping

Folding

Polishing glass or metal

Table scrubbing

Cloth washing

Plant watering

 

 

4. Grace and Courtesy               

Greeting and handshake

Walking on the tine

Offering assistance

Serving food

Silence game

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ways to incorporate practical life into the home

 

having your child help with…

 

  • setting the table
  • cleaning (dusting, scrubbing, sweeping, mopping, doing dishes etc)
  • plant watering and gardening
  • cooking/making play dough
  • polishing (silver, wood, plant leaves, shoes, mirrors)
  • laundry (separating clothes, adding detergent, folding)

 

encouraging...

 

  • independence
  • order/tidiness
  • grace and courtesy
    • looking in the eyes
    • pleases and thank yous
    • greetings (hellos and goodbyes)
    • sharing responsibility
    • helping others
    • inside versus outside bodies and voices
    • gentle hands
    • tucking in chairs
    • cleaning up messes

 

 

 

 

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The Montessori Family's Role

The Montessori Family’s Role

 

by P Donohue Shortridge

 

Tips for Daily Life…

 

Routine, routine, routine!

Your child can do just about everything for himself.

“Every useless aid arrests development.” Maria Montessori

Everybody does chores/show him how.

Hands on activities are best.

Limits are needed for your child’s optimum development.

Your child shows you he needs more limits when he acts out.

Unstructured, slow time in nature is crucial every day.

Tv/movies/dvds, organized sports and computer skills can wait.

Do not negotiate what is not negotiable/ “OK?” at the end of a sentence.

Slow down; your child cannot move, think, talk or transition as quickly as you can.

Together, sort through your child’s books and toys then remove many of them.

Each possession has a place.

Be present; your child does not understand “later.”

More conversation and laughter, less badgering.

Your word is your bond/your child is learning to trust from you.

Enjoy and accompany your child through his development.

 

Parenting is the biggest work you will ever do. Your child needs you to do it well.

 

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Praise in the Montessori Classroom

A Montessori Approach to Praise

By Deb Chitwood

New research in the book Nurture Shock: New Thinking about Children by Po Bronson and Ashley Merryman shows what Maria Montessori saw years ago – that we don’t need to praise our children for everything they do. We don’t need to continually reward our children or tell them how smart and talented they are.

As a matter of fact, telling our children how smart and talented they are can create the opposite of what we want. It can make our children afraid to attempt new things, afraid of failure, afraid they won’t meet everyone’s expectations.

What does the research suggest? When we praise, it’s best for the praise to be related to the effort our children made. For praise to be effective, it also needs to be specific and sincere.

So, how exactly does the research fit with Montessori philosophy?

1. In Montessori education, there aren’t rewards and punishments. Maria Montessori believed in the child’s inner need to do productive work. Sensitive periods provide an internal urge and stronger reinforcement than any rewards or praise could do.

“The essence of independence is to be able to do something for one’s self. Adults work to finish a task, but the child works in order to grow, and is working to create the adult, the person that is to be.” Maria Montessori

2. Montessorians don’t give children lavish praise. The child’s work is highly valued in Montessori education, and praise that is given is typically specific praise emphasizing effort. “You really worked hard at that.” “You did that activity four times in a row!” In an article at Maria Montessori, Bobby and June George give the idea of saying simply, “You did it!”

3. Montessorians try to give encouragement rather than praise or descriptive rather than evaluative praise. Instead of saying, “You’re a good boy,” a Montessorian might say, “It really helped when you put away all the dishes.”

4. Montessorians try to help children do things themselves and gain self-confidence. Many of the Montessori materials have a control of error so that the child can tell immediately if an activity is done correctly. An external source of approval isn’t necessary.

 5. Through Montessori practical life activities, children develop order, concentration, coordination, and independence. Those are all qualities that make children self-confident and capable of listening to their own inner voice.

Have you seen Montessori ideas on praise work for your child?

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Separation Anxiety in Toddlers and Preschoolers

 

Handling Separation Anxiety


Tips for Montessori Parents

  • Make the goodbye prompt and positive. This sounds easy, but can often be one of the most difficult things to do. Giving your child “one more minute” or staying to work on a puzzle together simply prolongs the inevitable. As a parent, the best thing you can do is give your child a hug and kiss, say, “I love you” and reassure him/her that you will be back soon.
  • Establish a goodbye routine. Preschoolers crave routine and Montessori parents who establish a consistent goodbye routine usually have better luck with successful goodbyes. I have seen parents use a secret handshake with their child or a secret hand gesture. Other parents give their child a kiss on the forehead or offer a reassuring thumbs-up or rub noses with their child. By giving your child something he can count on, he is likely to go to school much more willingly and that special moment between the two of you is a great way to start the day and provide that sense of reassurance.
  • Trust your child's teacher. This may be difficult to do when you do not yet know your child’s Montessori teacher that well, but keep in mind that Montessori preschool teachers have chosen this profession because they love children and they have a wealth of ideas and strategies to help settle a child who is feeling upset. The strategies might involve anything from a nurturing hug, redirection, pairing them up with another Montessori student or simply keeping the child close until he/she is ready to engage with an activity. Ask your child's Montessori teacher to step in to help with goodbyes when you give the sign that you are ready to go.
  • Acknowledge how your child is feeling. It is important to accept and respect your child's temporary unhappiness as it is very real and very normal. Say things like "I know you feel sad when Mommy leaves, but you will have a good time, and I will be back very soon.” Avoid the temptation to pressure your child not to cry or to offer bribes for "good behavior". Learning to cope with sadness is an important learning process for your child.
  • Never sneak out on a child. As tempting as it is, sneaking out the door can make matters worse. Although you do not have to stay to witness a meltdown, it may be very upsetting for the child when they realize Mom or Dad has simply disappeared without saying goodbye and it can make the next day even more difficult. The best thing a parent can do is deal directly the situation and before you know it, the tearful goodbyes will be no more. Besides, you want your child to know unequivocally that he/she can trust you.
  • Ask for help. Sometimes stepping back from the drop off routine can make a huge difference in how your child reacts. Often, a child who experiences separation anxiety with one parent is absolutely fine if the other parent does the drop off.
  • Do not linger. As a parent, I know how reassuring it can be to stay to peek at your child through the window. However, for the child, it can be pure torture. As a child, seeing your parent when you are upset, but not being able to be with your parent is not a good feeling. My suggestion to Montessori parents is to leave quickly and if you are feeling really uneasy, call the school in 15-20 minutes to ask how your child is doing. Chances are, he/she settled within a few minutes.
  • Stay calm and be enthusiastic. Modeling the appropriate behavior is key to a smooth transition from home to Montessori classroom, so try very hard to ensure your child does not sense your anxiety. Talk about how much fun Montessori preschool will be, talk about her friends and classmates. Discuss the different works she might want to choose and reinforce how lucky she is to have such a special school and that you cannot wait to hear about her day when you pick her up.
  • Always be on time. Arriving late can often spark separation anxiety. Arriving late can be upsetting to some children as the Montessori class has already begun. Give yourselves plenty of time in the morning. Children often get anxious when rushed, so do your best to give your child extra time in the morning to get ready and to arrive at school on time with the group. Additionally, it is important to be punctual when picking up your child. I know how easy it is to lose track of time, but no matter who is picking your child up, whether it is you or someone else, make sure you are there on time. If you are late, it can cause your child even more anxiety and make dropping her off the next time that much harder.
  • Encourage friendships. Make a point to set up ‘playdates’ for your child. Invite children from the Montessori class over, so your child can make friendships that will in turn make the transition to the new Montessori environment easier.

NOTE: Be prepared for regression. Just when you think your child has conquered his/her feelings of separation anxiety, along comes a weekend or an illness that keeps your child home for a few days and you are right back to square one. As frustrating and upsetting as this can be, it is perfectly normal. Stick to the above strategies and you should notice a significant different in a couple of days.

Taken from North American Montessori Center’s blog at http://montessoritraining.blog...

 

In a nutshell: 

  1. BE CONSISTENT WITH YOUR MORNING ROUTINE

  2. Make your goodbye short, confident and matter of fact. Hug, kiss, move through the gate or door, wave goodbye and leave. Make it a routine.

  3. Be clear that you are going to leave. Tell your child, “I am going to work now. I will see you… (when you will be returning).”

  4. Do not ask your child’s permission to leave, he or she has a choice to cry or not to cry, but not whether you leave or stay.

  5. Let a teacher know what is going on in your child’s day. For example: “Bella is hungry this morning, she did not have any breakfast today.” Or “We took Harry’s dad to the airport this morning. He will be gone for a few days.”

  6. Avoid bribing with special treats/toys.

  7. It is okay to feel sad or guilty but hanging around and acting upset will make your child feel that it is wrong you are leaving.

  8. Please do not apologize for leaving your child. Let him know he/she is in a safe place and you will see them again soon.

  9.  A teacher is always happy to call you or e-mail you and let you know how your child is doing after a difficult drop-off. Check Transparent Classroom for updates as well.

What have you found helpful with your child's drop-offs?

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Nurturing the Spirit

Here in North Bend in this pocket of nature and beauty, it is easy to see and nurture the wonder already present in our learners. With Mt. Si in the back-drop, visiting birds and squirrels, and daily worm hunts in the garden we can take the time to appreciate our surroundings. However, as an educator, the task of nurturing the spirits of these little beings can seem quite overwhelming. As Aline Wolf tells us in her book of the same title, 

"Our task as spiritual nurturers becomes easier when we realize that we do not have to instill spirituality in the child, we have only to protect it from being trampled and nourish its natural growth."

Dr. Maria Montessori states that if we can meticulously create an environment with this in mind, we can reach and therefore nourish the spirit of the child. At Mt. Si Arbor Montessori School, this is our goal. 

We cannot discount this importance of reaching this goal daily. Yes, we want our learners to reach their academic goals and they do with the use of our hands-on Montessori developed math, language and geography materials. But what we are speaking of here goes much deeper than that- we delve in to the development of compassion, forgiveness, honesty, kindness, and love.This is what we are referring to when we say the nurturing of the spirit within our prepared indoor and outdoor environments. This is an education for life. 

We invite you to come see this for yourself. Our toddler and primary classrooms are always open for observation with an appointment. 

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Events

Open House Event!

Join Anne Granderson, Positive Discipline Educator and mom of four, for an Intro to Positive Discipline. During this 2 hour session we'll dig into what it means to raise children in a way that feels RESPECTFUL and EFFECTIVE. You will leave with a framework for parenting with firmness AND kindness that will strengthen parent-child relationships, foster independence and confidence, and bring more ease and joy to your family life.

To register for this FREE event visit: 

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/intro-to-positive-discipline-tickets-54688799672?aff=mtsiarbor 

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